GP BLOG ROUND-UP #13

Our favourite blogs and articles from around the web. Have something to add? Get in touch today.

1) GPs, it is time to face the elephant in the room

Dr Des Spence dishes out some bitter truths about the future of general practice.

“General practice will continue irrespective of what happens: even if there is no more money or GPs to recruit. The crisis we face is not about money it’s about ‘work-life balance’. Working in a hospital currently is a lot more appealing to young doctors than a chaotic general practice. Offering more money will have a paradoxical effect; doctors will simply work less for the same money. To think otherwise is denial. Read more.

2) How can GPs provide rapid access alongside long-term continuity of care?

Beccy Baird talks about tackling the challenge of providing both rapid access and long-term continuity of care.

Last year the Fund carried out detailed research to see if we could get a better picture of what was actually happening in general practice. We found that GPs were under huge pressure for a variety of reasons, including activity rising faster than investment and workforce numbers; the increasing complexity of patients whose care is now managed in general practice; new services and clinical advances; and complex relationships with the wider health and care system, where pressures in one part lead to pressures on another. Read more.

3) NHS Health Check: How one GP practice tackled waiting times

GP practice in Plymouth has reduced the time it takes to get a routine appointment with a doctor from three-to-four weeks to under seven days. Read more.

4) Which deadly sin can help save the NHS?

Dr Adrew Foster writes: “Since antiquity, mankind has held a belief in the deadly sins. A list of seven infamous and destructive vices may not feel like the natural place to look for inspiration to help a health service creaking under a myriad of pressures and challenges.

But, there is one deadly sin that Doctors and other healthcare workers would benefit from indulging in more often.” Read more.

 

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